ADME 2.10 NEW TECHNOLOGY APPROACH & LANDING AIDS

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ADME 2.10 NEW TECHNOLOGY APPROACH & LANDING AIDS

ICAO has developed a transition plan allowing the introduction of new technology approach and landing aids (currently MLS and GNSS). IFATCA is concerned that the more complex environment created by the use of a number of new approach aids will create operational problems for controllers. These problems can be reduced by using the principles associated with RNP in the design of operational procedures, so avoiding the need for the controller to know which aircraft is using which precision approach aid and reducing RTF.


IFATCA Policy is:

Working procedures and/or systems should provide the approach capability of the flight to relevant controllers.


See: Resolution B9, B18, B19, B20, B21 – WP 163 – Las Vegas 2016

See also: ADME 2.8


During the last few years there has been a significant increase in the number of approach types in use. This is due in the main to the introduction of new technologies, such as Global Positioning System (GPS) and Area Navigation (RNAV). States have introduced approach types with differing terminology and differing criteria. There is a pressing need to rationalise the multitude of approach types and to introduce consistent terminology and criteria. There are plans within ICAO to try and achieve this through the Performance Based Navigation (PBN) concept. IFATCA should support such a move. In the meantime, there are several recommendations that should be accepted to assist controllers in dealing with the various approach types.


IFATCA Policy is:

The variety of approach types, and the associated complexity to the controller, should be reduced. The type of approach sub-category should be transparent to the controller in order to maintain an acceptable workload.

Even if they are being provided with all the necessary information on an aircraft navigational capabilities (FPL, displayed info) air traffic controllers should not be responsible to check aircraft or air crew navigational capabilities prior to issuing an approach clearance as it is the responsibility of operators and crews to comply with the PBN requirements for the given airspace.


See: WP 84 – Istanbul 2007 and Resolution B3 – WP 90 – Conchal 2019

 

Last Update: July 17, 2020  

November 4, 2019   68   Jean-Francois Lepage    ADME    

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